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WinCompose

WinCompose supports the standard Compose file format.

WinCompose Reviews and details

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  • WinCompose Landing page
    Landing page //
    2023-09-13

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Social recommendations and mentions

We have tracked the following product recommendations or mentions on various public social media platforms and blogs. They can help you see what people think about WinCompose and what they use it for.
  • Victor Mono Typeface
    Julia has made symbol input manageable and lets you define infix operators for many of the Unicode symbols that make sense for that. [1] And JuliaMono was designed to support the symbols that Julia does. [2] I generally do quite fine with my Compose Key configuration, though (even on Windows, where I use WinCompose). [3] [1]: https://docs.julialang.org/en/v1/manual/unicode-input/ [2]:... - Source: Hacker News / 7 months ago
  • bach - a tool for searching compose sequences
    Credit to wincompose's GUI for inspiration, which provides similar functionality on Windows. Source: 12 months ago
  • Client got a ridiculous IRS notice and an erroneous refund
    Or if you're on Linux or using WinCompose, you can hit Compose + s + o. Source: about 1 year ago
  • How to insert special characters?
    I really like using the idea of the compose key (although I do use digraphs, as mentioned here, once in a while). A compose key will work outside of Vim, as well. On Gnome, you can use Gnome Tweaks. Other DEs will also support this (internet search!). If you are using a plain window manager on Xorg, then read this. If you are on Windows, install Wincompose. MacOS? Who knows! All work the same way. My compose key... Source: about 1 year ago
  • Wait that exists?
    I have AltGr mapped to WinCompose so it sees some use. Source: about 1 year ago
  • The Internet arguments would be grand
    Most Linux and BSD Unix distributions have this built in. Often the right control key is "Compose", but check your config. Windows users can use WinCompose. Not sure what the best option is for MacOS, it has a built-in "hold OPTION and a key to get a menu of related characters" function. Ios and Android keyboards usually just let you hold down ? And get a menu of other characters, including interrobang. Source: over 1 year ago
  • If a potential group is abelian, do we even need to check for associativity?
    I personally use a compose key. Specifically, wincompose. Source: over 1 year ago
  • How do you type Dutch tremas ( ï or ë ) on a German keyboard?
    For Windows, there is a nifty little app called WinCompose that allows you to designate one key as your compose key. Hitting that key causes following keypresses not to immediately produce characters, but rather wait for a sequence of keys that defines a character. Source: over 1 year ago
  • German keyboard layout?
    There is an open source app "WinCompose", which adds a compose key to Windows. I use it all the time to write symbols like ±, ≠, and ‰, as well as foreign "fused" (like æ) or accented letters. Source: over 1 year ago
  • What is the cardinality of the difference of two countably finite sets?
    I use XCompose to enter a large set of characters using nothing but a regular keyboard. XCompose comes pre-installed on all major GNU/Linux distributons, and you just need to enable it. There is also an implementation of XCompose for Windows. Source: over 1 year ago
  • So... non English alphabets in Paradox games.
    I'd strongly recommend installing WinCompose. Map the compose key to something you never use for anything else—I prefer the menu key—and then you can type special characters by hitting the compose key and then combinations of other characters. Source: over 1 year ago
  • Hermione Granger, Art by Dana Terrace based on the character by J.K. Rowling
    Protip: Install WinCompose so you can easily enter complicated symbols and emojis.≠would be whatever key you choose for your compose key (mine is the right click key on the keyboard) and = and / and you're done. Source: over 1 year ago
  • Help: HP BIOS not saving
    Not OP, but I like WinCompose if you are using Windows. Source: almost 2 years ago
  • Can I reconfigure my keyboard so that there is a key that types the infinity symbol?
    What I use is a piece of software called WinCompose that turns your right alt key into a compose key. Source: almost 2 years ago
  • Head mod of r/cultsurvivors claims since we all live in a culture, we all live in a cult. Subreddit rebellion ensues.
    Oh yeah, baby. I credit it to being able to use Compose Keys (on Linux you'll need to edit some .XCompose configs, but on Windows you use WinCompose. Source: almost 2 years ago
  • Turkey sends letter to UN to change country’s foreign name to ‘Türkiye’
    If you're on Linux or using WinCompose, you press: Compose + u + ". Source: about 2 years ago
  • German OLKB users - how do you do your "Umlaute"?
    Another fallback are the windows Alt+Numpad combos to send unicode strings. I made custom keycodes that hold Alt and then tap each of the numpad keys required for the German special characters. This works really well and does not require wincompose or any other third party software. However, it is limited to Microsoft Windows only and it does not work very well in the Microsoft Office suite: Somehow, using these... Source: about 2 years ago
  • My current dailies: Boardwalk and Planck
    As explained under "Basic Unicode" in [feature_unicode.md](https://github.com/qmk/qmk_firmware/blob/master/docs/feature_unicode.md). Then for my Unicode keys I set up a big enum in `keymap.c`: Enum unicode_keys { // Greek UC_ALPA = UC(0x03b1), // α UC_BETA = UC(0x03b2), // β // ... // Shifted Greek US_ALPA = UC(0x0391), // Α US_BETA = UC(0x0392), // Β // ... // Other symbols ... Source: about 2 years ago
  • Alternatives to normal text
    Alternatively, WinCompose (GitHub) is a program that can help you write symbols using key combinations, and you can also make your own custom combinations. Source: about 2 years ago
  • What is the Point of a having a Keyboard with no Number Pad?
    I had the exact same concern when switching to a TKL keyboard, since alt codes are pretty much the only reason I reach for the numpad. Solution? Install WinCompose. Now I have access to pretty much every special glyph with (mostly) intuitive key combos. Source: about 2 years ago
  • Pain when you're looking keycaps
    I can recommend WinCompose as well. You get used to the common shortcuts (ö, ä, ü) pretty quickly. Source: over 2 years ago

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This is an informative page about WinCompose. You can review and discuss the product here. The primary details have not been verified within the last quarter, and they might be outdated. If you think we are missing something, please use the means on this page to comment or suggest changes. All reviews and comments are highly encouranged and appreciated as they help everyone in the community to make an informed choice. Please always be kind and objective when evaluating a product and sharing your opinion.